Benjamin D. Lazarus

Tradd Street

Merchant and reformer

Home of steamship agent and merchant Benjamin Dores Lazarus (1800–1875), who ran B. D. Lazarus & Co., a hardware store on East Bay Street. He and his brother Michael Lazarus were among the forty-seven young men who signed the 1824 Convention of Israelites petition to the adjunta. B. D. Lazarus lived on Tradd Street near the home of his parents, Marks and Rachel Lazarus, until 1840, when he married Cornelia Cohen (1805–1886) and moved into a larger house, also on Tradd, with his widowed mother and his two unmarried sisters. Despite their relatively advanced ages (he was in his 40s, and she five years younger), between 1841 and 1849, B. D. and Cornelia Lazarus had six children who survived to adulthood. Cornelia C. Lazarus became a wealthy woman in her own right when the estate of her father, Mordecai Cohen, was settled after his death in 1848. She received in trust for her life, with her children to inherit, three store buildings on Dewees Wharf, land in Cheraw, South Carolina, and Fayetteville, North Carolina, and one-fourth of her father’s remaining property, including slaves, real estate, and personal goods.

Benjamin Dores Lazarus (1800–1875)

Benjamin Dores Lazarus (1800–1875)

Artist unknown. Private collection.
Benjamin Lazarus’s hymnal

Benjamin Lazarus’s hymnal

Hymns Written for the Service of Hebrew Congregation Beth Elohim, Charleston, SC: Levin and Tavel, 1842. Hymnal belonged to Benjamin Dores Lazarus (1800–1875), shown here with his Confederate States of America, Southern Cross of Honor, ca. 1865.
Hymnal page, Day of Atonement

Hymnal page, Day of Atonement

Benjamin Lazarus's Beth Elohim hymnal, page 63.
Hymnal page, New Year

Hymnal page, New Year

Benjamin Lazarus's Beth Elohim hymnal, page 61.
Lazarus bill of sale for an enslaved woman

Lazarus bill of sale for an enslaved woman

Bill of sale for the "slave Margaret with her future issue and increase,” dated December 14, 1858, purchased for $1,000 by Francis A. Mitchell from Benjamin D. Lazarus. Courtesy Avery Research Center, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC.